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iFixit shares detailed review of the Vision Pro display: “You can fit 50 of these pixels into one iPhone pixel”

After publishing the first video over the weekend, iFixit is back with the second part of its Apple Vision Pro teardown. This time around, the focus is on the Vision Pro's two 4K resolution screens, and iFixit wonders if the display actually has 4K resolution.

In the video, iFixit says that the two Apple Vision Pro screens have a resolution of 3660 x 3200 pixels. 4K by definition is 3840 x 2160 pixels, so the Vision Pro is slightly lower horizontally and significantly taller vertically.

However, this difference does not detract from the impressive qualities of the Vision Pro displays. As iFixit explains in the video:

These values ​​do not meet the definition of 4K by commercial standards, but 4K TVs do not meet this requirement. In short, each of these panels has more pixels than a 4K TV, but they are not technically 4K.

Now we can calculate the number of pixels per inch of a display panel, or PPI. If we do the math and convert some units, the Vision Pro panels have a density of about 3380 pixels per inch.

You can fit 50 of these pixels into one iPhone pixel.

The last line is simply mind-boggling: “You can fit 50 of these pixels into one iPhone pixel.” Let's understand this.

There's also a pixels per degree calculation, which some say is more important for VR headsets than pixels per inch.

The math is very complex, but we can get some rough numbers.

We estimate that the Apple Vision Pro has an average PPD somewhere about 34 pixels with a 100-degree field of view, which seems accurate when compared to the Quest 3 in a very basic test.

Compared to the Apple Vision Pro On the Quest 3, the Apple Vision Pro's field of view is slightly narrower, but the image quality noticeably higher.

Finally, iFixit gives the Apple Vision Pro a repairability score of 4/10, which the company describes as “Preliminary.” There appears to be no interfacing of parts and many of the components are modular, iFixit explains:

Although the device is difficult to get into, mainly due to Apple's “glue and glass” school of engineering, I was surprised to find a complete lack of mating parts.

The headphone speakers and bands are modular in design and don't appear to be are paired.

We ran into some issues when swapping screens between one device and another, but I feel like it had more to do with calibration than parts joining.

Headband and light seal are also modular, which shouldn't be taken for granted given the U-flap index with that non-removable rear cushion.

On the bad side, we have a non-repairable front glass and OLED panel. The battery pack is also physically locked so it cannot be opened without causing harm.

It is unlikely that Apple will provide parts or service manuals for this device without the battery pack and light blockers.

Unlikely that Apple will provide parts or service manuals for this device without the battery pack and light blockers.

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Watch the full iFixit video below.

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